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Flog- set 3

My weekly FLOG (FRIDAY BLOG, GREAT NAME, RIGHT?) each WEEK I WILL DO A ROUND UP OF SOMETHING I'VE LEARNT, SOMETHING I CAN TEACH YOU AND ONE THING that will improve your performance.



The picture above shows Dalton after managing to break a med ball during our session. That's how good I am..


This week is fight week for Charlie Edwards, you can tune in on Saturday night on BT sports to see, what I'm sure is going to be a powerful performance.


I launched my rebrand this week which I'm so happy with. Finally feel like it reflects my business.


Let's go into the good stuff.


Something I have learned


'Always think before you speak'


This one sounds obvious right, but it's so true. Sometimes, we say stuff or do stuff in anger or due to another kind of reason.


Managing your emotions is key in life and fighting. If you can't let something go in life, how do you expect to stay calm in a fight? If someone annoys you and you want to react, how can you stick to a game plan against an opponent you don't like?


It's all related. How we act in life, is how you act in the ring.


Fortunately for me, I don't get in a ring now. So when I react in anger, say stuff I shouldn't, it just makes me feel bad.


That's a lesson to learn from.


did you know...


There are two kinds of stretch shortening cycles - fast and slow.


The stretch shortening cycle (SSC) is the pre stretch and then countermovement seen in something like a jump for example, where people dip down, load up the tendons and muscles and use this to increase height.


A fast SSC is defined as <250 milliseconds

A slow SSC is defined as >250 milliseconds


Examples of a fast SSC would be a pogo, where as a countermovement jump would be slower.


The time of the cycle will effect the power output. The slower SSC will utilise the rebound more and therefore will produce a higher peak power output. Due to the fast SSC being more stiff in nature and not utilising the full capabilities, the peak power will be less.


However, a faster SSC will, of course, have a higher rate of force development.


Both are key for performance.


the 1%


Marginal gains. The idea that small changes over a long period, add up to a massive improvement and, in this case, a performance improvement.


The 1% section will give you something you can add to do this.


Who warms up properly before every session? I'm talking S&C, boxing, runs? Probably not many.


The warm up is key. A sub optimal warm up will result in a less than perfect training performance.


Now, I get it, you want to get in and started.


Ok, so in true 1% style and keeping it simple, try this.


3 mins mobility

3 mins dynamic movements

2 mins activation

2 mins priming for session specific drills


10 mins total.


Adding that in before your sessions will give your body the stimulus it needs in order to ready it for the session ahead.


That means you can make the most of every minute in the gym.


Thanks


Well done for reading this far! Hope you enjoyed this week's blog. As always, if you have any questions or want more information, drop me a message. Instagram is probably the best bet.

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